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Why we’re all still obsessed with Misty Copeland

Hello Glamazonians!

Ever since Misty Copeland landed the coveted spot of Principal Dancer, it seems more people are enamored of her. As someone who has been following Copeland’s career for the past few years, I can tell you that she is so worth the attention we’re giving her. Being given the spot of principal dancer means that she is the highest rank of the dancers at American Ballet Theatre! Copeland is the also first Black woman to ever hold that title in ABT’s 75 year history. Isn’t it interesting that in 2015 we’re still talking about people of colour making new strides in their professions? I have friends who say to me, “why can’t we just celebrate her accomplishment, must it be about race all the time”? I say to them the same thing I say to everyone who asks that question. When we get to a place where being the first person of colour in a position isn’t such a monumental achievement, then our work is done. Until then, we celebrate Misty for her hard work and celebrate the strides she’s making for young girls in the Ballet world.


~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)

GLAMAZONIAN QUOTE OF THE WEEK!!!

Hello Glamazonians! Ever since Lady Lupita Nyong’o spoke oh-so-eloquently at Essence Magazine’s Black Women in Hollywood luncheon almost two months ago, I haven’t been able to get her words out of my head. I couldn’t figure out which part of her speech to post for Glamazonian Quote of the Week, so I decided to post the entire the video. So clearly my lovefest for for the woman isn’t ending anytime soon!

~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)

NIGERIAN AUTHOR CHIMAMANDA NGOZI EDOCHIE’S RESPONSE TO ANTI-GAY LAW

Hello Glamazonians! I recently came across an op-ed piece written by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie online and wanted to share it. The article was released in regards to the new anti-gay bill that was signed into law by Nigerian president, Goodluck Jonathan, that deems same-sex relationships punishable up to fourteen years in prison. The article was originally posted on TheScoop.

“I will call him Sochukwuma. A thin, smiling boy who liked to play with us girls at the university primary school in Nsukka. We were young. We knew he was different, we said, ‘he’s not like the other boys.’ But his was a benign and unquestioned difference; it was simply what it was. We did not have a name for him. We did not know the word ‘gay.’ He was Sochukwuma and he was friendly and he played oga so well that his side always won.

In secondary school, some boys in his class tried to throw Sochukwuma off a second floor balcony. They were strapping teenagers who had learned to notice, and fear, difference. They had a name for him. Homo. They mocked him because his hips swayed when he walked and his hands fluttered when he spoke. He brushed away their taunts, silently, sometimes grinning an uncomfortable grin. He must have wished that he could be what they wanted him to be. I imagine now how helplessly lonely he must have felt. The boys often asked, “Why can’t he just be like everyone else?”

Possible answers to that question include ‘because he is abnormal,’ ‘because he is a sinner, ‘because he chose the lifestyle.’ But the truest answer is ‘We don’t know.’ There is humility and humanity in accepting that there are things we simply don’t know. At the age of 8, Sochukwuma was obviously different.  It was not about sex, because it could not possibly have been – his hormones were of course not yet fully formed – but it was an awareness of himself, and other children’s awareness of him, as different. He could not have ‘chosen the lifestyle’ because he was too young to do so. And why would he – or anybody – choose to be homosexual in a world that makes life so difficult for homosexuals?

A crime is a crime for a reason. A crime has victims. A crime harms society. On what basis is homosexuality a crime? Adults do no harm to society in how they love and whom they love. This is a law that will not prevent crime, but will, instead, lead to crimes of violence: there are already, in different parts of Nigeria, attacks on people ‘suspected’ of being gay. Ours is a society where men are openly affectionate with one another. Men hold hands. Men hug each other. Shall we now arrest friends who share a hotel room, or who walk side by side? How do we determine the clunky expressions in the law – ‘mutually beneficial,’ ‘directly or indirectly?’

Many Nigerians support the law because they believe the Bible condemns homosexuality. The Bible can be a basis for how we choose to live our personal lives, but it cannot be a basis for the laws we pass, not only because the holy books of different religions do not have equal significance for all Nigerians but also because the holy books are read differently by different people. The Bible, for example, also condemns fornication and adultery and divorce, but they are not crimes.

For supporters of the law, there seems to be something about homosexuality that sets it apart. A sense that it is not ‘normal.’ If we are part of a majority group, we tend to think others in minority groups are abnormal, not because they have done anything wrong, but because we have defined normal to be what we are and since they are not like us, then they are abnormal. Supporters of the law want a certain semblance of human homogeneity. But we cannot legislate into existence a world that does not exist: the truth of our human condition is that we are a diverse, multi-faceted species. The measure of our humanity lies, in part, in how we think of those different from us. We cannot – should not – have empathy only for people who are like us…” READ THE REST ON THE SCOOP.

P.S Congratulations to Ms. Chimamanda who just won the U.S National Book Critics Circle Award for her recent book, ‘Americanah.’ I plan on purchasing it and so should you!

~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!!!

Hello Glamazonians! I recently turned 18 and I wanted to share a few pictures with you all! Okay so it was a week ago, but since I celebrated my birthday the entire week; I call it my birth week, it’s not too late for this post, right? It feels great to not be a minor anymore, imagine being a freshman in college and everyone being surprised when you tell them your age. Well not anymore, haha.

Happy birthday to all my Glamazonian Geminis out there!

Of all the fabulous presents I received, my fave was Kerry Washington’s Elle Magazine cover! It was literally sold out in most stores so when my dad handed me the mag I literally lost my mind for a few seconds/minutes/hours/days/still not over it!
birthday girl

My super-adorable-and-at-times-very-annoying brother and I! I had to bribe him to take this picture with me.
birthday gal and her brother

~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)

GLAMAZONIAN QUOTE OF THE WEEK!!!

“Elegance is a glowing inner peace. Grace is an ability to give as well as to receive and be thankful. Mystery is a hidden laugh always ready to surface! Glamour only radiates if there is a sublime courage & bravery within: glamour is like the moon; it only shines because the sun is there.” ~C. JOYBELL C.~

~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)

GLAMAZONIAN QUOTE OF THE WEEK!!!

 “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours — it is an amazing journey — and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.” ~Bob Moawad~ 

~FIERCE & LOVE
XoXo Whitney:)